Welcome Guest Sign In 🔍
Page still loading ...

Content Page

Last Updated July 9, 2020, 12:54 pm 🖶

Doodlin'

doodlin'-piano.png ALT IMG
Upload your music sheets to Sheets/ConcertKey None found !!
Horrace plays this is D-flat, which is a little tricky to read. Robben Ford's version is in the key of C. The sheet can be found in Standards Real Book page 115 but key of E-flat Notice the rythmic difference between the Horrace Siler Jazz version and the Robben Ford version. Horrace play the riff end to end each over 3 beats but Robben plays:
C bars 1-4 BOOM! TWO THREE FOUR | ONE TWO THREE BOOM | BOOM TWO THREE FOUR | ONE TWO THREE BOOM ....|
G bars 6-7 BOOM! TWO THREE FOUR | ONE TWO THREE BOOM |
C bars 8-9 BOOM TWO THREE FOUR | ONE TWO THREE BOOM ....|
a pair = 6 beats + two rests = two exact bars. So Robbens version does not Walk over the 4/4 time.
Points
  1. The riff repeats a 3-beat pattern 4 times across 4/4 time. 4x3 = 12beats = 3 bars!!!
  2. The effect is that the riff shifts it's starting beat within the 4/4 measures.
    1st Beat 2 of bar 1
    2nd Beat 1 of bar 2
    3rd Beat 4 of bar 2
    4th Beat 3 of bar 3

Geography of Horrace Silver Version

Intro

The 12-bar riffs start on beat 2 of bar 1 so: 2-bar + 1 beat intro goes like this:
Both versions hit the first riff on the second beat of the bar. The difference is that the Rock/Blues version does that for every time repeatedly, but Horrace's jazz version walks across beats so that each repeat starts a beat later. 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 / / / | 3BEATRIFF | 3BEATRIFF

Robben Ford's Version

Similar 3-beat riff but This time, instead of playing 4 of these consecutively, he plays two and leaves 2 beats rest (drumbeat + stab organ chord) before the next 2. This puts all the riff pairs on the same start beat 2.

Rhythmically - We are following the Robben Ford Rhythmic Rock/Blues Style with the last four bars 9-12 using a diminished scale starting from the flat-6th of a semi-tone above the 5th. This is common in blues progressions these days but you don't hear it in the old Chicago blues.

ALT IMG
Robben Ford’s version seems to be unique. Ray Charles’ and Dee Dee Bridgewater’s (the latter is a vocal) versions, for example, follow the Silver arrangement. It may be that Robben Ford, as a blues player, liked the symmetry that his arrangement provides. I’m comfortable with his way! E

Horace Silver

Robben Ford version - in C.

Guitars

C Blues

Tenor Sax

D Blues
Horrace Silver Piano Sheet - Key Db Piano Sheet ALT

Sign in to follow page Show Vocabulary